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The Chicago Department of Aviation is looking to hear feedback from the residents surrounding O'Hare Airport on their current runway rotation test plan. The plan, which began in July, will expire in December and was an attempt to spread the noise generated by low-flying aircraft to different towns adjacent to the airport in weekly cycles. The intention of the plan is to give residents some predictability as to when to expect noise during those over night, Fly Quiet hours. 

"I encourage all my constituents to give their thoughts on the effectiveness of the runway rotation plan," state Rep. McAuliffe. "Providing feedback is a good step in continuing to implement changes to bring noise relief to the area."

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The newly announced Illinois Competitiveness Council is expected to help promote economic growth and job creation by cutting the red tape in Illinois. Created through Executive Order 16-13, the council will review all agency rules and regulations to ensure current regulations are up to date and relevant to today’s industries and practices; ensure the language in rules are easy to understand; reduce the amount of unduly burdensome requirements on businesses, social service providers, and citizens through both time and cost; and ensure there is a clear need for the regulation.

In addition, the Illinois Competitiveness Council will look for recommendations to improve Illinois’ licensing environment to promote job growth and job creation. Currently, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) has more than a million active licenses in more than 200 license categories, however for nearly a third, IDFPR has issued fewer than 100 licenses. The growth of these licenses has increased 184 percent in the last 20 years.

The goal of the council is to save Illinoisans at least $250 million in direct license fee costs over the next decade, and save Illinois taxpayers and business owners at least 4 million pages in paperwork.

Illinois residents are encouraged to talk directly to the Council through a website where they can report unnecessary red tape that they are familiar with.  

Park Ridge, IL… The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) recently announced a significant investment in communities, which will have a positive impact on Niles and Park Ridge in particular, according to State Representative Michael McAuliffe (R-Chicago). The grants are part of the Illinois Transportation Improvement Program (ITEP), which received 241 project applications requesting a total of $261.3 million. The highly competitive program awarded money to just 33 grants at a total of $30.7 million dollars. The money for the projects comes from a federal transportation bill signed in to law last year; Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act, or “FAST Act”.  

“These grants are designed to help neighborhoods and towns showcase their attractiveness as places to live and the towns of Niles and Park Ridge are well deserving of that,” Rep. McAuliffe said. “The communities in the 20th district are already great places to work and raise a family; this latest commitment from the State will only improve upon that.”

Park Ridge will receive over $1.2 million dollars to landscape and beautify a section of the South Northwest Highway. Niles will receive a similar investment of almost seven hundred thousand dollars for work on Milwaukee Avenue improvements. Niles and Park Ridge must commit a local match of at least 20 percent to their projects.
State Representative Michael McAuliffe received recognition for his work to help those combating Hepatitis C by the American Liver Foundation's Great Lakes Division. As the chair of the Hepatitis C Task Force, Rep. McAuliffe has spearheaded efforts to bring awareness to what was once referred to as the "silent epidemic." 
"I am humbled to receive such an honor and will continue to work towards new solutions to make available proper testing and prevention for Hepatitis C," Rep. McAuliffe said.

The Hepatitis C Task Force has become a model for similar entities in other states and held its first Hepatitis C and Liver Health Awareness event this past spring. At the event over fifty people were tested for the HCV and further received helpful information regarding liver health.

The Village of Harwood Heights has received a $2.165 million grant from the state to build a new recreation center. The money had been suspended due to state budget restrictions, but is now finally being authorized.

From the Chicago Tribune:

State Rep. Michael McAuliffe brought an oversized check from the state to the Sept. 22 Village Board meeting. He said he pressured state leaders to release the funding to Harwood Heights.

"We had money that was approved by previous general assemblies, (but) the governor suspended a lot of grants," McAuliffe said. "Due to some hard work on behalf of myself and Senator John Mulroe, we're happy to see the governor is releasing it because that back room needs to be fixed."
The state of Illinois has backed off a 2-year-old policy that allowed only its sickest residents with hepatitis C who rely on the traditional Medicaid program to get disease-curing drugs.

The policy change, announced Friday evening, means Illinois residents on Medicaid with stage 3 liver scarring — not just the sickest patients with stage 4 liver scarring — will be able to access the drugs. If left untreated, hepatitis C can lead to liver failure, cancer and even death.

At least 12,000 Illinoisans covered by Medicaid had been diagnosed with hepatitis C as of last year, according to the state.


State Rep. Michael McAuliffe, R-Chicago, was elated to hear of the new policy Friday. McAuliffe is chairman of the state's task force on hepatitis C, which he created after losing his father-in-law, brother-in-law and uncle to complications of hepatitis C. The task force had been pushing for changes to the policy.

"I think it's going to save a lot of lives," McAuliffe said.

Read more on the policy change at the Chicago Tribune.