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More than 45,000 people will be adversely affected by jet noise if the runway expansion project at O'Hare International Airport is completed, according to a new analysis released Thursday that said Chicago and the Federal Aviation Administration severely understated how many residents would be significantly disturbed.

The study also said that the number of nighttime flights will be almost double what the FAA estimated in assessing the environmental impact of the $10 billion O'Hare overhaul.

Read more from the Chicago Tribune
As we head into the holiday season, I wanted to provide you with an update on news from both Springfield and back home on the issues we are facing and work we’ve done on behalf of the 20th District.  Needless to say, the good news from Springfield is in short supply as the budget impasse continues to take its toll on service providers and local governments. 

We as House members have remained in session since May, travelling to Springfield each week and month in hopes a budget breakthrough happens.  I’ve done my best to work across the aisle on solutions to these issues, and remain committed to working with all sides on bringing about a compromise.  As we saw last week, this is possible if we work together.

The House will reconvene on December 2nd.  If prior to then you have any comments, questions or concerns please do not hesitate to contact my office.  And now we’ll get to some state and local updates.  

Report to the Community by Representative Christine Winger:

O’Hare Noise Measures
Several measures were introduced in the Illinois General Assembly this year by a bipartisan group of lawmakers that would provide relief to constituents impacted by adverse noise from O’Hare airport. Rep. Christine Winger was a sponsor on all of these bills. Only one of these bills became law, the others will be reworked and introduced again next year.  Here is the list of legislation that was considered:

Last week a bipartisan agreement involving both business and labor leaders was reached regarding unemployment insurance. It covers the procedures that take place when a worker is laid off or otherwise subjected to no-fault unemployment, was reached. Many of the benefits created by the Illinois unemployment insurance (UI) statute were scheduled to sunset at the end of 2015, creating an incentive for Illinois business and labor to come to the negotiating table. 

In Illinois, most people in this position are granted the right to receive unemployment insurance (UI) for up to 26 weeks in any one-year period after they are laid off. UI payments are overseen by the Illinois Department of Employment Security, which provided staff support for the agreement. Under an important provision of the agreement, the new UI law will explicitly protect the interests of employers that terminate an employee who has demonstrated grossly negligent conduct and thereby endangered self or co-workers, or damaged an employer’s property. Under the revised UI law, these individuals will not be eligible to receive UI payments. There is an appeal process that provides administrative review, upon separation, to former workers who believe they were improperly treated.

In a key facet of the agreement, recently separated workers who are also eligible for Social Security will now be eligible to both collect Social Security and receive a full Illinois UI benefit. Illinois is currently only one of two states to subtract 50 percent of the Social Security unemployment benefit from dual eligible recipients.Moving to full UI benefits will lead to an addition $25 million/year being paid to Illinois senior citizens who have suffered layoffs.

HB 1285, with the UI amendment attached, unanimously passed the Senate on November 10 and is expected to be passed by the House when it returns on December 2.
State Rep McAuliffe attended the street dedication for officer Joseph P Cali, who was killed in the line of duty. P.O. Joseph P. Cali was shot and killed by a sniper on May 19, 1975.  He lived in the 6400 block of Oxford Street. After 40 years, the City of Chicago is dedicating a street in his honor.  Oxford, from Devon to Avondale, now has street signs honoring Joe. The dedication was on Saturday, November 14.
State Representative McAullife was invited by AT&T to join in the check presentation of $75,000 to "Avenues to Independence". At the request of AT&T, Rep McAuliffe recommended this worthwhile charity in the 20th district located in Park Ridge. Avenues is a non-profit organization that provides homes, jobs and community living programs to Chicago area adults with physical, intellectual, and other developmental disabilities, such as Down syndrome, autism, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. The check was presented with AT&T Pioneers, a group of current and retired telecom workers that volunteer to help communities. The contribution will support computer and workforce training, in partnership with Donka, Inc, a non-profit that provides the training, for up to 170 people with developmental disabilities working toward employment. 

The nonpartisan Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability(CGFA), the in-house budget agency of the Illinois General Assembly, released their October 2015 fiscal report this week. The CGFA “monthly briefing” covers ongoing State revenues, particularly key State General Funds revenue numbers, and ongoing trends likely to affect future State revenues. For example, the October briefing includes a discussion, based on nationwide trends and economic models, of the likely health of the 2015 Christmas retail selling season and its expected impact on State sales tax revenues.

CGFA, working in conjunction with the Illinois Department of Revenue, uncovered continued dismal trends in State revenues this October. Illinois general funds revenues were $319 million lower in October 2015 (fiscal year 2016) than they had been in October 2014. General Funds revenues come from income taxes, sales taxes, and other sources. As in previous months, the decline was paced by a year-over-year shortfall in State personal income tax revenues and corporate income tax revenues. The accumulated deficit for the four months of FY16 so far experienced is $1,456 million. The current fiscal year began on July 1, 2015.